Headlight shadow on windshield

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Hyundai/Genesis ut

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No, it does not. It's a byproduct of the cutoff in the light. The only thing you're going to achieve by adjusting the lights up is moving the entire pattern up and throwing more glare into oncoming traffic.
I found that the lights can be adjusted up enough to take some of that dark latter off of the road immediately in front of you, and as cars approach, the headlight height on the palisade is low enough to not bother on coming cars. If they drive a Mazda Miata then it is so low that any headlight is lighting their cabin up! It’s all relative! Have you ever had a Ford f 150 behind you at a stop light? The lights will be reflecting off every available mirror and all you can do is turn your mirrors or cover your eyes!
 

awedbychrist

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No, it does not. It's a byproduct of the cutoff in the light. The only thing you're going to achieve by adjusting the lights up is moving the entire pattern up and throwing more glare into oncoming traffic.
So this is another one of those, the engineers should look at it so that they can get rid of it, problems that they somehow introduced into the Palisade.
 

saxman242

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I found that the lights can be adjusted up enough to take some of that dark latter off of the road immediately in front of you
If there is dark on the road immediately in front of you, the headlights are out of alignment. You should have light on the road immediately in front of you for a good 300 feet.


So this is another one of those, the engineers should look at it so that they can get rid of it, problems that they somehow introduced into the Palisade
The dip in the light isn't a problem. It's there as a byproduct of the cutoff of the headlight assembly being designed such that more light is put out to the left (if you're in a LHD country). Changing the cutoff to "remove" the dark spot would result in significantly less light on the road, not more.

Typically, the headlight cutoff pattern is a by product of a shade inside of the projector assembly (in the case of projector based headlights, obviously), not the external shrouding. In this case, you'd actually need to make a larger shade and block more light to bring the output in line with other vehicles.

Normally, headlight output looks like this:

1623096576114.png
With a lower left side beam pattern for oncoming traffic and a step up ahead of you with more light on the right.

What the Hyundai lights are doing are filling out the light on the left side, leaving a dip for oncoming traffic, like so:

1623096599079.png
That dark triangle is there because the light beam “dips” to avoid blinding oncoming traffic, then is raised again to continue lighting the side of the road. What you don’t get is that other manufacturers also have their light beam “dip” on the left side, but they usually keep it low the rest of the way. So it just looks like a dip in the middle instead of a V-shaped triangle. So with Hyundai, you actually get more light on the left than on other cars.

Below is the IIHS test report for the Palisade’s LED head lights. The V-shaped triangle is that part in the center left to avoid blinding other oncoming traffic. Take note of the distances on the x-axis. I’m posting the Toyota Highlander LED test report below as a point of comparison. Notice how the Palisade left and right side are both equivalent in distance. Now look at the Highlander: the right side goes way further than the left. That’s because they have that “dip” going all the way to the left. Whereas the Palisade only dips in the center and gives you more light on the left side.

Palisade (2021 Hyundai Palisade 4-door SUV):


1623096992506.png
Highlander (2021 Toyota Highlander 4-door SUV):
1623097027404.png
 

awedbychrist

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Saxman, Wow, that is a pretty impressive presentation. Thanks for the explanation. Still, if they could still figure out how do get rid of the dark dip, it would make the car better to drive. For me, the dark dip is a big negative. I think for some it will present a safety concern as they come around a corner at night and see this dark figure bounding across a field and unwittingly swerve to avoid something that is not really there. Thanks again, though, it is amazing to get a glimpse of how much planning they put into it. Your post was top notch.
 

Mr. iNCREDIBLE

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My Palisade
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If there is dark on the road immediately in front of you, the headlights are out of alignment. You should have light on the road immediately in front of you for a good 300 feet.



The dip in the light isn't a problem. It's there as a byproduct of the cutoff of the headlight assembly being designed such that more light is put out to the left (if you're in a LHD country). Changing the cutoff to "remove" the dark spot would result in significantly less light on the road, not more.

Typically, the headlight cutoff pattern is a by product of a shade inside of the projector assembly (in the case of projector based headlights, obviously), not the external shrouding. In this case, you'd actually need to make a larger shade and block more light to bring the output in line with other vehicles.

Normally, headlight output looks like this:

View attachment 2335
With a lower left side beam pattern for oncoming traffic and a step up ahead of you with more light on the right.

What the Hyundai lights are doing are filling out the light on the left side, leaving a dip for oncoming traffic, like so:

View attachment 2336
That dark triangle is there because the light beam “dips” to avoid blinding oncoming traffic, then is raised again to continue lighting the side of the road. What you don’t get is that other manufacturers also have their light beam “dip” on the left side, but they usually keep it low the rest of the way. So it just looks like a dip in the middle instead of a V-shaped triangle. So with Hyundai, you actually get more light on the left than on other cars.

Below is the IIHS test report for the Palisade’s LED head lights. The V-shaped triangle is that part in the center left to avoid blinding other oncoming traffic. Take note of the distances on the x-axis. I’m posting the Toyota Highlander LED test report below as a point of comparison. Notice how the Palisade left and right side are both equivalent in distance. Now look at the Highlander: the right side goes way further than the left. That’s because they have that “dip” going all the way to the left. Whereas the Palisade only dips in the center and gives you more light on the left side.

Palisade (2021 Hyundai Palisade 4-door SUV):


View attachment 2337
Highlander (2021 Toyota Highlander 4-door SUV):
View attachment 2338




best post ever!
 

saxman242

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For me, the dark dip is a big negative. I think for some it will present a safety concern as they come around a corner at night and see this dark figure bounding across a field and unwittingly swerve to avoid something that is not really there.
How long have you had your palisade? I think you'll find it is something that you get used to.
 

elp_jc

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To be clear, the self leveling shocks are only on the rear. They are only really doing anything if you have a very heavy load like towing something. They’re just designed to keep the rear height level with the front.
You just proved my point with that statement. Ha ha. The car's attitude is not going to change in any meaningful way with self-leveling shocks, whether you have 100, 250, or 500 lbs at the rear (the front hardly changes). So Hyundai should have adjusted the headlights more precisely on Palisades; THAT was my point.
 

Hyundai/Genesis ut

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So this is another one of those, the engineers should look at it so that they can get rid of it, problems that they somehow introduced into the Palisade.
I don’t really think so. Every headlight now a days has a cut off unless it is one of those reflector types which are aimed down all across the beam. Most headlights with a cut off dip down as you look out for the car, the right is higher and the left is dipped, so as to not offend or blind on coming vehicles. All that Hyundai did was to dip it down but then to raise it back up again to the far left, hence the V . I like the way the left of the road is illuminated, and still on coming traffic on a two lane gets some reprieve! Think about it!
 
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Hyundai/Genesis ut

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You just proved my point with that statement. Ha ha. The car's attitude is not going to change in any meaningful way with self-leveling shocks, whether you have 100, 250, or 500 lbs at the rear (the front hardly changes). So Hyundai should have adjusted the headlights more precisely on Palisades; THAT was my point.
The adjustment screws are there for a reason. Adjust them to your liking until you are happy with the beam and not getting flashed by offenders drivers. It’s really easy!
 

elp_jc

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Indeed. I don't have an issue with the stock lighting, so will leave it alone. But those who do can mess with the adjustments... but you have to know what you're doing :). And don't mess with the horizontal adjustments, although they're typically protected.
 
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