Timing Belt or chain

saxman242

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Do you know which ones?
The vast majority of motors made between 1990 and 2010 used a timing belt. The timing chain was common before that, and then belts came into favor because they were a better solution. Chain technology has improved since, which is why we're seeing motors moving back to chains.

Essentially, they use toothed belts and they have a set replacement interval to combat stretching. They were used because the maintenance costs on them were significantly less.
 

love2rv

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I think the real question to be asked here is does the Palisade have an interference or non-interference engine? If interference then if the timing goes off it takes the valve train out with it, if non-interference if timing goes off similar internal engine damage is avoided.

Timing belts have been used a long time, any vehicle that has a service interval on timing is likely a belt vs chain. Toyota/Lexus has a lot of models with 90k mile timing service as an example. I am most familiar with the Toyota services as that was our previous vehicle and we have a Toyota truck in driveway next to the Palisade.

This is a good video about the subject: video
 

Zenar

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Oh wow, that's crazy... I'll be sure to stay away from those
my honda had a timing belt. 300k on her when i changed it. Only reason i changed it was the water pump went so the mechanic was right there anyways, i said fuck it change it and i got him to gap my valves too. Back yard mechanic used to shoot the shit while he worked on the car. It was great, which he was a hyundai tech lol
 

Hyundai/Genesis ut

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Timing will always be done through a chain. A belt will never be used in timing because of the chance of slippage or breakage...if that were to happen, it could be catastrophic, especially with modern interference engines.
Wrong! Many cars have had timing belts, and you are correct.....it can be catastrophic in an interference engine!
 

Alan_F

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The Hyundai V6 Lambda engine uses a timing chain to control the engine valves. Like virtually all engines, there is a belt to drive other things such as the A/C compressor, water pump, alternator, and any hydraulic systems. Any reference in the manual to inspection or maintenance of the drive belt does not refer to the timing chain.
 

Cloudman

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Thank you! I just joined the forum moments ago, partly to find the answers to questions I have about a 2022 Palisade I'm considering and you've cleared up my uncertainty about the timing chain vs. a belt. I've been assuming that the V6 is an interference engine and I've been hoping that "belt" was the answer.
 

elp_jc

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Hondas and Acuras with their ancient 3.5L V6s still use freaking belts, but that's the only current engine that I know of that still uses belts. All others use proper chains now. What I'm curious about is if our 3.8L uses solid valve lifters, or hydraulic valve tappets, since it's quite noisy for the latter.
 

Alan_F

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Hondas and Acuras with their ancient 3.5L V6s still use freaking belts, but that's the only current engine that I know of that still uses belts. All others use proper chains now. What I'm curious about is if our 3.8L uses solid valve lifters, or hydraulic valve tappets, since it's quite noisy for the latter.
The Palisade owners manual says this about valve clearance maintenance every 60K miles:

"Inspect for excessive valve noise and/or engine vibration and adjust if necessary. Have an authorized authorized HYUNDAI dealer perform the operation."
 
G

G-46951

Does anyone know if the Palisade has a timing Belt or chain?
You won’t have to worry about that. I traded mine way before any issues of having a problem with that timing chain.
I know you were not asking about durability but I think it may have been inferred in your question.
I already had 76,000 miles on my palisade and I had to replace a idler pulley so I put a new drive belt, but the timing is driven by a chain.
I just wanted to say don’t worry but do worry about the problem of oil consumption as well as the gumming up of oil on the back of the valves. I had both and I traded the car as soon as I could instead of dealing with the issue which is not covered under warranty and will reappear every 40 or 50 thousand miles.
 

Gene

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Timing will always be done through a chain. A belt will never be used in timing because of the chance of slippage or breakage...if that were to happen, it could be catastrophic, especially with modern interference engines.
Timing belts use cog teeth so they don't slip
 

elp_jc

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If they break, they do :). That's why it's critical to replace them at the proper interval. But with excessive heat, I just don't trust them to last that long. And since I live in the desert (TX), after reading of numerous issues as early as 30K miles, I sold the Acura MDX and Accord V6 6MT, and never a belt again. Honda seems to be the only automaker still using them on their ancient V6s.
 

Cloudman

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I am new here and unsure about where to ask questions. Please straighten me out if this question needs to be submitted in some other way.

I have learned that the camshafts of the Palisade (and Telluride) engine are chain-driven with two timing chains. The valve train doesn't have hydraulic tappets. Solid buckets are used instead, which require valve clearance adjustment every 60,000 miles. That procedure of checking the valve clearance and adjusting if necessary really concerns me because I figure it's going to be an expensive proposition. Have any of you had experience with that or do you know how much dealerships intend to change for the service?
 

Alan_F

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I am new here and unsure about where to ask questions. Please straighten me out if this question needs to be submitted in some other way.

I have learned that the camshafts of the Palisade (and Telluride) engine are chain-driven with two timing chains. The valve train doesn't have hydraulic tappets. Solid buckets are used instead, which require valve clearance adjustment every 60,000 miles. That procedure of checking the valve clearance and adjusting if necessary really concerns me because I figure it's going to be an expensive proposition. Have any of you had experience with that or do you know how much dealerships intend to change for the service?
I have an older Lambda V6 3.8L on a Hyundai Genesis with about 71K miles, and have not had my valves adjusted. The Palisade owner's manual (just like my Genesis manual) says "Inspect for excessive valve noise and/or engine vibration and adjust if necessary." But I have not encountered excessive valve noise and/or engine vibration (based on my own observation), nor have I heard anyone else who had them adjusted after 60K, although some people may have had the adjustment performed.

You are correct that it might be expensive to have a dealer do that, and I would be concerned about them doing it correctly. The only way to know for sure what it would cost is to ask a dealer service department, because different dealers probably charge different amounts. Also, a dealer service advisor might give you some idea on how often they have had to do the adjustments on that engine (used in several different Hyundai's and Genesis models).
 

Cloudman

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So are we 100% that the Palisade does, in fact, have a Timing Chain? Thanks to all for the research and insight.

Here is a quote from an article I've linked you to (above).

"Camshafts are chain-driven (engine has two timing chains). The valve train doesn't have hydraulic tappets. Solid buckets are used instead, which require valve clearance adjustment using shims every 60,000 miles ---"

The Kia Telluride and the Hyundai Pallisade use the same engine. What I find troubling, and it could be because of my lack of knowledge, is why do the use solid buckets instead of hydraulic lifters? It seems to me that the required clearance check and adjustment (if necessary) will be very costly. Wouldn't hydraulic lifters solve that issue? What am I missing?
 

Cloudman

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I have an older Lambda V6 3.8L on a Hyundai Genesis with about 71K miles, and have not had my valves adjusted. The Palisade owner's manual (just like my Genesis manual) says "Inspect for excessive valve noise and/or engine vibration and adjust if necessary." But I have not encountered excessive valve noise and/or engine vibration (based on my own observation), nor have I heard anyone else who had them adjusted after 60K, although some people may have had the adjustment performed.

You are correct that it might be expensive to have a dealer do that, and I would be concerned about them doing it correctly. The only way to know for sure what it would cost is to ask a dealer service department, because different dealers probably charge different amounts. Also, a dealer service advisor might give you some idea on how often they have had to do the adjustments on that engine (used in several different Hyundai's and Genesis models).
Thank you very much for your input. Of course the next logical question to my mind, perhaps because I lack certain knowledge and understanding, is why aren't hydraulic tappets used instead of solid buckets? Wouldn't that eliminate the adjustment issue." It seems that I must be missing something fundamental.

See link: 3.8L Engine (Lambda RS/MPI/GDI) - In-Depth Look at Design and Reliability
 

Alan_F

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Thank you very much for your input. Of course the next logical question to my mind, perhaps because I lack certain knowledge and understanding, is why aren't hydraulic tappets used instead of solid buckets? Wouldn't that eliminate the adjustment issue." It seems that I must be missing something fundamental.

See link: 3.8L Engine (Lambda RS/MPI/GDI) - In-Depth Look at Design and Reliability
I don't know enough about engine design to say. However, the Hyundai Genesis models had the Lambda 3.8L V6 or the Tau 4.6L V8 as an option (I guess Koreans like the Greek alphabet). The Tau V8 did not need any valve adjustments per the owners manual.

However, there was one big problem with the valves on the Tau V8. If you started up the engine when cold, and immediately shut it off within less than a minute, and then tried to start it again later, the valves (which apparently rely on gravity to get back to their correct starting position) may not drop down correctly and may be heavily damaged on the second start. According to the Hyundai Genesis forum I was a member of, there were quite a few Tau V8 engines damaged or ruined this way. It was also worse if the car was parked on a steep hill (taking longer for gravity to drop the valves back to their correct starting position). Once the engine warmed up for at least a few minutes, the valves did drop down to the correct starting position for the next start when the engine was shut off.

Since I never actually heard of anyone on the Hyundai Genesis forum complaining about the Lambda V6 valves needing adjustment (despite the owner's manual warning) and I have not experienced that problem myself, I am very happy with the Lambda engine so far. After 72K miles, using Mobil 1 EP 5W-30 motor oil every 5K-7K miles, my engine has never experienced any visible drop in oil level between oil changes (as indicated by the dipstick), and runs as good as new.
 

Cloudman

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I don't see a timing chain or timing belt service in my service interval documentation. Does that mean its life of the engine and no service required at specific intervals?
Do you see anything in your service interval directives that specify checking the valve clearance at 60,000 miles? If so, that sounds like an expensive bummer to me? I don't yet own a vehicle with that engine and that could be a deal breaker for me.
 

Alan_F

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Do you see anything in your service interval directives that specify checking the valve clearance at 60,000 miles? If so, that sounds like an expensive bummer to me? I don't yet own a vehicle with that engine and that could be a deal breaker for me.
The Palisade owner's manual says:

"Valve clearance - Inspect every 60,000 miles (96,000 km) or 72 months."

In a footnote for the valve clearance the owners manual says: "Inspect for excessive valve noise and/or engine vibration and adjust if necessary. Have an authorized authorized HYUNDAI dealer perform the operation."

For the rubber drive belt(s) used to drive the A/C compressor, alternator, etc, the owner's manual says "At first, inspect at 60,000 miles (96,000 km) or 72 months, after that, inspect every 15,000 miles (24,000 km) or 24 months. The drive belt should be replaced when cracks occur or tension is reduced." Note that the rubber drive belt is different from the timing chain, which does not require any scheduled service on the Lambda V6.
 
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